Węgry dla Węgrów

Kontrola pochodzenia etnicznego wśród polityków węgierskich;

Węgry dla Węgrów,

 

a Polska?

- Polska; dla żydów i Niemców

(-)Red.

 

If you think running for office in the United States is rigorous, then you haven’t met Hungary’s far-right Jobbik party. After the April 2010 legislative elections that handed the extremist group 47 seats in the national assembly — and before local elections that fall — an unnamed Jobbik MP made a special effort to gain the upper hand by undergoing genetic testing “to ensure he did not have a Roma or Jewish ethnic background.” The lab results were published by a Hungarian far-right website in May. According to the report from medical diagnostic company Nagy Gen, the MP, whose name was blacked out, has “No genetic trace of Jewish or Roma ancestors.”

The company, which faces a criminal investigation for violating the country’s Law on Genetics, “examined 18 positions in the MP’s genome” for supposedly Jewish and Roma variants, but Joerg Schmidtke, president of the European Society of Human Genetics, criticized the company:

“This is a gross distortion of the values of genetic testing…. In addition, the test proves nothing; it is impossible to deduce someone’s origins from testing so few places of the genome.”

Jobbik is the third-largest party in Hungary’s parliament, and is known for its anti-Semitic and anti-Roma platform. European Jewish Congress president Moshe Kantor found the racial purity test a cause for immediate concern:

“This test demonstrates a very troubling escalation by the Jobbik party … into a genetic and racial ideology that appears to be a short step below a fully-fledged Nazi worldview.”

The icing on the cake, though, is the fact that three-time Olympic water polo champion Tibor Benedek, a member of a prominent Jewish family, held a minority financial stake in the Nagy Gen, but he pulled out immediately after the report was published.

It’s good to know that racial purity is making a comeback, but if the testing was truly unprofessional, it’s entirely possible we may have another Vladimir Zhinirovsky on our hands.

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One Response to Węgry dla Węgrów

  1. KSC 19/06/2012 at 06:52 #

    Zhirinovsky admits Jewish roots
    Vladimir Zhirinovsky signing books
    An earlier book launch: Mr Zhirinovsky is a prolific author
    Russia’s flamboyant ultra-nationalist, Vladimir Zhirinovsky -- a notorious anti-Semite -- has stopped denying that his father was a Jew.

    Why should I reject Russian blood, Russian culture, Russian land, and fall in love with the Jewish people?

    Vladimir Zhirinovsky
    “My father was a Jew, a Polish Jew,” he says in a new book published this week.

    “His name was Volf Isaakovich Eidelshtein.”

    Mr Zhirinovsky always denied, or glossed over, his father’s Jewishness -- even after a reporter found dug up documents in 1994 that showed his family name was Eidelshtein until he changed it at the age of 18.

    Ethnic Russian

    “My mother was Russian, my father was a lawyer,” he once said.

    He has at various times accused Jews of:

    Bringing Russia to ruin
    Sending Russian women abroad as prostitutes
    Selling healthy children and transplant organs to the West
    Provoking the Holocaust

    This year he refused to honour a moment’s silence for the Nazis’ Jewish victims in the Russian parliament, on the grounds that to do so would be an insult to the millions of Russian victims of the Second World War.

    In his latest book, Ivan Close Your Soul, Mr Zhirinovsky repeatedly states that he considers himself an ethnic Russian.

    Emigration

    “Why should I reject Russian blood, Russian culture, Russian land, and fall in love with the Jewish people only because of that single drop of blood that my father left in my mother’s body?” he writes.

    Vladimir Zhirinovsky addresses demonstrators protesting against a new land code
    Mr Zhirinovsky’s election success in 1993 boosted Jewish emigration
    Jewish activists have said that the success of Mr Zhirinovsky’s Liberal Democratic Party of Russia in the 1993 general election, when it won nearly a quarter of the vote, caused tens of thousands of Jews to emigrate.

    His popularity has faded in recent years.

    Although he is now a deputy speaker of the Russian parliament, many Russian voters see him as an entertainer, not a serious politician.

    Anger targets

    There are also signs that Russian anti-Semitism, which survived the transition from tsarist to Soviet rule, is now on the wane.

    The chief rabbi of Russia’s Federation of Jewish Communities, Berl Lazar, says it has become fashionable for people who formerly hid their Jewish roots to advertise them publicly.

    “Thousands and thousands of people who knew they were Jewish and were hiding it… are opening up their closets,” he told the Associated Press news agency.

    Polls show that Russians have found other targets for their anger, in particular Chechens and other dark-skinned natives of the Caucasus.

    See also:

    10 Mar 00 | Europe
    Zhirinovsky: Russia’s political eccentric
    06 Mar 00 | Europe
    Zhirinovsky back in presidential race
    05 Jul 01 | Europe
    Duma debate sparks street fight
    Internet links:

    Liberal Democratic Party of Russia

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